October 12th, 2014
October 4th, 2014
August 11th, 2014

(Source: gnossienne, via timemarauder)

July 7th, 2014
June 16th, 2014
June 7th, 2014

Let it go - the
smashed word broken
open vow or
the oath cracked length
wise - let it go it
was sworn to
go

let them go - the
truthful liars and
the false fair friends
and the “boths” and
“neithers” - you must let them go they
were born
to go

let all go - the
big small middling
tall bigger really
the biggest and all
things - let all go
dear

so comes love.”

e.e cummings, “Let It Go” (via fables-of-the-reconstruction)

(via myownliteraryself)

June 1st, 2014
everyfiredies:

poetsorg:

Read Paul Laurence Dunbar’s poem “Sympathy,” which inspired Maya Angelou’s famous memoir I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings.

One of my favorite lesson plans of the year:
- students read and annotate this poem and write an analysis of the metaphor- students read and annotate Angelou’s “Caged Bird” poem and write an analysis of the metaphor - students read and annotate Alicia Keys’s song “Caged Bird” and write an analysis of the metaphor- students then write a synthesis paragraph that explains how the authors use the metaphor similarly and differently, and how the meaning of the metaphor develops.
This lesson happens alongside To Kill a Mockingbird, and it’s just splendid. It also covers key reading and writing standards.
And this is why my kids were respectful when my principal made the announcement to the school about Maya Angelou’s death. They understand the significance of her work and how it fits into our country’s history and present.

everyfiredies:

poetsorg:

Read Paul Laurence Dunbar’s poem “Sympathy,” which inspired Maya Angelou’s famous memoir I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings.

One of my favorite lesson plans of the year:

- students read and annotate this poem and write an analysis of the metaphor
- students read and annotate Angelou’s “Caged Bird” poem and write an analysis of the metaphor
- students read and annotate Alicia Keys’s song “Caged Bird” and write an analysis of the metaphor
- students then write a synthesis paragraph that explains how the authors use the metaphor similarly and differently, and how the meaning of the metaphor develops.

This lesson happens alongside To Kill a Mockingbird, and it’s just splendid. It also covers key reading and writing standards.

And this is why my kids were respectful when my principal made the announcement to the school about Maya Angelou’s death. They understand the significance of her work and how it fits into our country’s history and present.

(via englishmajorinrepair)

May 23rd, 2014
theparisreview:

Anne Sexton, The Art of Poetry No. 15

theparisreview:

Anne Sexton, The Art of Poetry No. 15

(via englishmajorinrepair)

May 20th, 2014
No one’s fated or doomed to love anyone.
The accidents happen, we’re not heroines,
they happen in our lives like car crashes,
books that change us, neighborhoods
we move into and come to love.
Tristan und Isolde is scarcely the story,
women at least should know the difference
between love and death. No prison cup,
no penance. Merely a notion that the tape - recorder
should have caught some ghost of us: that tape - recorder
not merely played but should have listened to us,
and could instruct those after us:
this we were, this is how we tried to love,
and these are the forces we had ranged within us
within us and against us, against us and within us.
"XVII,” Adrienne Rich (via commovente)

(via myownliteraryself)

May 16th, 2014
I will remember the kisses
our lips raw with love
and how you gave me
everything you had
and how I
offered you what was left of
me,
and I will remember your small room
the feel of you
the light in the window
your records
your books
our morning coffee
our noons our nights
our bodies spilled together
sleeping
the tiny flowing currents
immediate and forever
your leg my leg
your arm my arm
your smile and the warmth
of you
who made me laugh
again.
Charles Bukowski (via quotes-shape-us)

(via langleav)

April 20th, 2014

nprbooks:

Via Paste magazine, David Tennant reads Shakespeare’s Sonnet 126:

O thou, my lovely boy, who in thy power
Dost hold Time’s fickle glass, his sickle, hour;
Who hast by waning grown, and therein showest
Thy lovers withering, as thy sweet self growest.
If Nature, sovereign mistress over wrack,
As thou goest onwards still will pluck thee back,
She keeps thee to this purpose, that her skill
May time disgrace and wretched minutes kill.
Yet fear her, O thou minion of her pleasure!
She may detain, but not still keep, her treasure:
Her audit (though delayed) answered must be,
And her quietus is to render thee.

C…c…can’t talk, drooling.

— Petra

(via everythingly)

sixpenceee:

signifi-cunt:

sixpenceee:

A compilation of Edward Gorey and his rather gothic poems and illustrations. 

Check out his dark children alaphabet illustrations

Well that was disturbing in a nice way

like the darker more twisted version of Shel Silverstein 

(via raebyrd)

April 12th, 2014

when god lets my body be
From each brave eye shall sprout a tree
fruit that dangles therefrom

the purpled world will dance upon
Between my lips which did sing

a rose shall beget the spring
that maidens whom passion wastes

will lay between their little breasts
My strong fingers beneath the snow

Into strenuous birds shall go
my love walking in the grass

their wings will touch with her face
and all the while shall my heart be

With the bulge and nuzzle of the sea

e.e. cummings (via theunquotables)

(via myownliteraryself)

April 6th, 2014

zombiebondage:

Some poems from “B Is for Bad Poetry” by Pamela August Russell

(via englishmajorhumor)